Animals in your area

Discussion in 'Sciences' started by HansonBro, May 14, 2019.

  1. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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    A little shake up from the normal, to add some personalization here. So what are some of the animals you see most often in your area? Rare/uncommon species? Cool interactions?

    Im in Oshawa, Ontario.

    Birds- Robins, starlings, finch (both brown and yellow), red cardinals, blue jays, geese, pigeons, orioles, seagulls and hawks

    Squirrels- black, grey, and red

    Chipmunks, rabbits, cats, mice

    Most notably for me, and this is just in my backyard in the city, is the orioles. Only see them a few times a year and then they're gone. The blue jays will almost eat peanuts out of my hand and i have two chipmunks living under my waterfall somewhere. And a random cat that comes for naps on my feet...

    Disclaimer. No I didnt classify or sciencefy everything
     
  2. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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    I left out things like deers, bears and turkey although they are in the area
     
  3. JMCx4

    JMCx4 Gateway to Hockey

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    At our previous home in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri, we had lots of brown squirrels (including one that took up residence in our attic several years back), small rabbits, the occasional opossum (once living & giving birth under our front porch) and moles (searching in vain for edibles in our lifeless soil), rarely skunks & raccoons (especially as more wooded areas were cleared for housing), and a family of red foxes until the public golf course evicted them. When my kids were young, a very large rogue snapping turtle wander into our back yard; too scary to capture & relocate, so we left the back gate open & he was seen smashed on a nearby thoroughfare a couple of days later. :( In the air, we had red-tailed hawks & robins & cardinals & jays & blackbirds primarily.

    We moved to a new home last September, about 10 miles away with more green space around us. White tailed deer were regular visitors to the front lawns of our street last fall. Over the wet winter & now in spring we have a mole colony of unknown size but known destruction burrowing under our lawn & in our garden beds. Not as many rabbits as I expected, and just a squirrel or two. Our large spruce tree out back is home to house finches & juncos, with robins & jays competing for territory. We've got a resident mourning dove that we see & hear in the evening. Saw some turkey vultures circling above a very large roadkilled ground hog last week not far away.
     
  4. tarheelhockey

    tarheelhockey Highest Boss

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    Location:
    The Triangle
    Central North Carolina...

    Birds: lots of common songbirds like robins, starlings, finches. Cardinals are the state bird and a fairly common sight, as are woodpeckers. Bluebirds and blue jays slightly less common but you do see them. Hummingbirds are skittish of humans but will come if you put something out to attract them. Lots of ducks and Canada geese, especially when they're migrating. Vultures are extremely common, and you'll see at least one or two hawks a day if you're looking for them. Owls are common but hard to spot for obvious reasons. I have seen wild bald eagles and ospreys near bodies of water, and herons are not uncommon.

    Mammals: small gray squirrels are everywhere. Chipmunks and cotton-tailed rabbits are less common than squirrels but they are present. You see the occasional raccoon, skunk, oppossum. Bats are common at night. Foxes and coyotes are not common sights but they are around at night. White-tailed deer are extremely common, especially in rural areas and the edges of suburbs.

    Snakes: black snakes and various garden snakes aren't too unusual. There are three poisonous varieties here: the copperhead (common), the cottonmouth (less common), and the rattlesnake (rare except in specific places)

    Other: lots of box turtles, frogs and toads, cicadas and other singing insects, little lizards and skinks.

    Rare sights:
    I have only ever seen one beaver, sitting on a highway guardrail next to a lake.
    There are wild alligators in low-lying swampy areas. You hear stories about them, but seeing one is a rarity.
    Sharks are the terror of the coastline, though actual attacks are rare.
    Wild pigs and wild turkeys if you're willing to go deep into the woods to look for them.
    Some places in the mountains and (oddly) the plains near the coast are known to have black bears.
    Wild horses on some of the coastal islands, descended from shipwrecks.
    Supposedly there are armadilloes, though I've never seen one.
     
  5. Big Z Man 1990

    Big Z Man 1990 Registered User

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    Bats are really helpful in the American summer. The consumption of tons of insects makes for good pest control.

    Also today I saw what I think was a squirrel outside while I was on a bus.
     
  6. JMCx4

    JMCx4 Gateway to Hockey

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    Was he holding an old lady at gunpoint & demanding she hand over that bag of acorns?
     
  7. Warden of the North

    Warden of the North The Matthews Show

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    Location:
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    Muskoka area of Ontario

    Weve got all the usual small stuff. For large mammals we have deer, bear, wolves, and moose (saw a moose this morning, actually). My family owns a large piece of property, so im lucky enough to see them all with some regularity.

    There is one rare species of venomous snake (massasauga rattler). Ive never seen one.

    Probably the funniest thing to see around here is a ruffed grouse. Its literally a wild chicken.
     
  8. PredsV82

    PredsV82 Fancy Stats Denier Sponsor

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    In the last week I've had 8 wild turkeys, at least two dozen deer, a groundhog and a bobcat all in my back yard(along with the usual rabbits and squirrels), and a 4 foot black snake on my pool deck. Not to mention innumerable geese on my front lawn.
     
  9. JMCx4

    JMCx4 Gateway to Hockey

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    If he's acting like this, don't turn your back on him ...

     
  10. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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    Lol. I have these at my cottage but without the "mane". They typically walk around in (whats a group of grouse called?) groups of 6-7. Its on an island
     
  11. JMCx4

    JMCx4 Gateway to Hockey

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    My fave is "lek," but "brace" or "brood" will do for this discussion.
     
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  12. Warden of the North

    Warden of the North The Matthews Show

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    The mane is technically the "ruff", hence ruffed grouse. Its only displayed during mating season. Its there all the time, just not visible the majority of it.

    I came across a grouse nest yesterday while hauling trees out of the bush with the tractor. The hen was lucky we didnt drive over her nest in the process. We're going to leave that area alone for a month or so before returning for the rest of the logs. Id feel terrible about crushing the nest by accident.
     
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  13. tacogeoff

    tacogeoff Registered User

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    Location:
    Killarney, MB
    Southwestern Mantioba. We live on an acreage by a provincial park

    Deer, elk, coyotes, skunks, moose, racoons, gophers, cougars (rare to see but one was trapped a few years back in the prov park and my co-worker took photos of two juveniles sunning on his woodpile...so hopefully they are making a comeback).


    Eagles, turkey, snow geese, Canadian geese, a large variety of ducks, hawks, the odd turkey vulture, herons, sand hill cranes , grouse, mourning doves, owls

    the list for birds goes on and is extensive. I cant name all the smaller song birds, typ0es of ducks etc.
     
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  14. kingsholygrail

    kingsholygrail Apex Smug Sponsor

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    Southern California. I regularly see a variety of sparrows, warblers, and finches. Hummingbirds, crows, ravens, and vultures. I did get a great shot of a hawk mantling a pigeon at work. I'll have to share it later. Rabbits and squirrels I see regularly. Coyotes I hear more often than see. Same with owls. Bald Eagles were re-introduced to the Channel Islands a while back and there's a nest in Big Bear. The Island Fox has made a dramatic recovery since the re-introduction of the Bald Eagle as they pushed the Golden Eagles off the islands as natural rivals. Bald Eagles feed mostly on fish and other birds while the Golden Eagle had decimated the Island Fox population. So the fox population has bounced back which is nice. Peregrine falcons have also been re-introduced to the region. They're a lot of fun to watch on the nest cams.
     
  15. The Crypto Guy

    The Crypto Guy Registered User

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    I have tons of Squirrels and Canadian Geese in my area of New York.
     
  16. AdmiralsFan24

    AdmiralsFan24 Registered User

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    Location:
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    Milwaukee suburbs

    Birds - robins, cardinals the usual common songbirds. Since I live on the water there are also lots of Canada geese, mallards, great blue herons and just recently some sandhill cranes have stopped by. Also have hawks which are common and falcons and owls that are less common.

    Reptiles - garter snakes, painted turtles and snapping turtles are about it.

    Mammals - thirteen-lined ground squirrels are everywhere. Mice, rabbits, squirrels, other various rodents. Mink, raccoons, opossums, bats, muskrats, deer, foxes and coyotes as well. Occasionally have young male cougars from the Black Hills come through looking for new territory.

    Here are the Sandhill Cranes.



    Here are the Canada Geese with their goslings.

     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  17. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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  18. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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  19. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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  20. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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  21. Sheppy

    Sheppy Registered User

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    Location:
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    Yellowknife, NT, Canada:

    Owls, Eagles (Lots around my cabin), Ravens, Seagulls, Grey Jays
    Squirrels, Muskrats, Beavers, Rabbits, Porcupine, Mice, Small frogs
    Moose, Caribou, Fox (Very populated), Coyotes, Black Bears, Grizzly Bears (rare), Bison (You see anywhere from 50-100 about 200 kms away driving into town), also Wolverines, those things are insane.

    Fish
    Lake Trout, Northern Pike, Arctic Grayling, Pickerel, Burbot, Arctic Char, Whitefish
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
  22. JMCx4

    JMCx4 Gateway to Hockey

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    :dunno:
    Do you own the miniature donkey, or was it just visiting?
     
  23. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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    He was just visiting. Quite popular on youtube though
     
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  24. JMCx4

    JMCx4 Gateway to Hockey

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    So do the domestic airlines allow Tiny Tim on board as his owner's "Emotional Support Donkey"? Maybe that's covered in another You Tube episode. :whatever:
     
  25. HansonBro

    HansonBro Registered User

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    Lol I am not asking them that
     

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